What Makes Squirrels “Squirrely”?

June 6, 2016 by  
Filed under Learn A.C., New Posts

Have You Ever Merged with a Squirrel?

Image of Squirrel

Well, I did, and ...

It was a once-in-a-lifetime experience.

I was immediately dizzy.

It felt like my head was spinning.

I had to pull back from the merge.

I had to sit down in a chair.

After grounding myself and regaining my balance, I asked the squirrel what it had felt.

The squirrel said it was fine ... just a little confused because I was so much slower than it was.

And that was the key.

We think that animals live at the same speed we do.

We know that many have shorter lifetimes than humans.

Maybe animals EXPERIENCE their lifetimes as just as long or just as short as ours feel to us?

Perhaps squirrels and other animals live at a faster vibrational frequency than most humans, or at least than I do.

Today, I've been reading a blog post by David Wilcock in which he explores how animals and humans perceive different speeds of flashing lights.

David WilcockDavid Wilcock

The speed at which something is shown to you can register in your mind without you "seeing" it with your eyes.  In this way, you can be "programmed" because the images and words are reaching directly into your subconscious mind.  This is called "subliminal messaging."

The thing about subliminal messages is that your Conscious mind doesn't know they are there and that you're being influenced by them.

Physicists tell us that everything is in wave form until Consciousness perceives it.  At that instant, the wave becomes a particle and appears to have form.

So what you perceive isn't there until you look at it.

Which means that the universe and all that we perceive is really flashing in and out of our perceptual range all the time.

Maybe squirrels see the universe differently because they are seeing things we can't see?  After all, dogs and elephants hear sounds we can't hear, right?

Are you feeling "squirrely" yet?

squirrel1

If you're practicing your animal communication by merging with animals, you might bring this up for discussion.

How does the animal with whom you're merging experience your rate of vibration compared to their own?

Please share you experiences by commenting on this post.

Red Fox Visitor

May 10, 2016 by  
Filed under In the Wild, New Posts

On the Hunt.

Fox on woodpile_web_004Look Who's Here for Breakfast.

It was already full daylight when I saw this red fox on the prowl.  Determined to find his own breakfast in my yard, he kept sniffing round and round atop the woodpile.

He even went up under the tarp, but he moved so fast, I couldn't catch that on my camera.

Fox on the woodpile_web_005From the intensity of his sniffing, somebody had crawled into the woodpile to escape.

Fox ran from side to side, jumped down, ran around, and kept sniffing.

When I saw him go up under the tarp, I was surprised.

Hattie, formerly feral cat now in spirit, once told me that hiding in a pile of wood was a good way to be safe from predators.

When I used to do lost animal work, cats would sometimes show themselves hiding inside piles of wood, either in the woods or someone's back yard.

But this fox, totally focused on the scent his capable nose was eagerly following, was undeterred by the woodpile.

Fox on woodpile_web_015Then he jumped to the ground and seemed ready to give up.

Was he just surveying the situation from another angle?

Or was he being "foxy?"

By moving away as though he had given up, he allowed his prey to think he might have gone.

Fox on woodpile_web_019He was waiting and watching.

With hawk-like precision, with nose fully active, he waited expectantly for the prey to make a break for it.

And a grey squirrel did emerge from the other side of the pile and run up a tree to safety.

Not at all deterred by this, the fox continued to check out the woodpile.

Fox on woodpile_web_022

Because he was so focused on his hunt, I didn't try to speak to the fox until after he left, using these photos as a way to connect.  But he was still hungry and still focused on breakfast, and didn't have any interest in speaking with me.

Meanwhile, I used his presence to educate my two young cats, Starlight and Melissa.  I made sure they were looking out the window while the hunt went on and explained that they could each be a substantial breakfast for this or any other fox.

Both young cats were fascinated by him.

STARLIGHT:  I get it.  I don't want to go out there while the fox is around.  But I'll have to get his scent to really identify him. 

MELISSA:  He's beautiful, but I'll bet he can't catch me.  I can jump higher than he can.

Fox on woodpile_sharpened_033

How Your Energy May Be Derailing Your Animal Communication.

May 5, 2016 by  
Filed under Learn A.C., New Posts

Gingersnap_dog

Gingersnap

My own dog snubbed me — again! In fact, it was the fourth or fifth time since I started down the path of learning animal communication a year earlier that Gingersnap left the room just as I was trying to telepath or practice some energy work with her. As she was my original motivation for wanting to learn this skill, this turn of events was disappointing.

How could it be? How could I be failing at something I put so much into? I had the drive, the desire, the enthusiasm, the love, the intention.

And it turns out, that was the problem!

The revelation came just a few moments later when I reported this latest incident to my psychic wife, who immediately had a little chat with our furry girl. Turns out, Ginger was afraid. Animal chakras tend to be larger and more open than ours, and so they often are much more sensitive to the energies they encounter. My excitement — my willpower — was overbearing and too much for her. Her personality, as she explained to my wife, requires a much more calm, gentle, slow approach.

And, of course, it makes perfect sense. Just like humans, animals are individuals and each has a different personality, tolerance, and preference. Your enthusiastic energy might be perfect for some, but off-putting to others. This disconnect could be causing some of your animal communication misfires!

How Would You Feel?

Imagine walking by someone's house and suddenly a bright, cheerful woman bursts through the front doorway and heads directly for you. "Hey! Good morning! Isn't it a GREAT day?! Are you having a wonderful walk? Do you want to come in and chat? Oh, where did you get that beautiful sweater? Do you like these flowers I planted?!" Even to an extrovert, her energy and approach may be overwhelming. You may unconsciously take a step or two back, cringe or recoil, or even run!

Successful communication is a two-way street. To blossom and flourish, both sides need to feel comfortable.

A more thoughtful approach might have been if the woman popped her head out of the doorway and gave you a friendly wave and a smile. You might wave and smile back, and feeling comfortable, add in a "good morning!" Perhaps that would open the door to a longer conversation or maybe it would be just enough to prime a future exchange — after several days of just the smiles and waves.

Just because you decide you are going to try to telepath with a particular animal doesn't mean they are ready for that, or that it's the right time, or even that your communication style and energy are right for building this bridge. A calmer, gentler, slower approach may be the perfect place to start until you understand your animal friend's comfort level.

Since my dog "taught" me this, I've noticed how true it is. In fact, as I wrote this sentence, she came and put her head right on my lap in confirmation!

Another Cat-astrophe Averted!

But I'm also thinking of my friend's very skittish cat, Hoodie, who I see every so often when my friend and I get together at his house for a weekly music jam. While the dog and even the other cat in this household love my visits and always stop by to hang out with me, Hoodie stays outdoors, runs to hide when I arrive, and rarely shows his face. He does that with everyone! Early on, I fantasized that I would use telepathy to reach this cat — to make a connection and be one of the few humans in his life who he would be comfortable with and actually want to say hi to. But even after months of trying, earnestly appealing to him using my budding animal communication skills, no luck!

Until one day I stopped trying so hard. I stopped putting out that willful energy that "I'm going to make this happen" and "If I'm just enthusiastic and friendly enough, he'll come around."

When I stopped projecting all that and just settled into my natural gentle, quiet nature, you might guess what happened. I got a long visit from him — indoors, even! And to my friend's disbelief, it wasn't the only time. Hoodie just needed a different approach to make him feel comfortable. I took the time to understand his style and it paid off.

Everything animate and inanimate — including thoughts, beings, and objects — is made of energy. Being able to sense and read it, becoming aware of the kind you are putting out there — and the kind those around you need — could be your next breakthrough in successful animal communication.

* * * * *

Josh Coen

Josh Coen

Josh Coen is a learning animal communicator who has spent a lifetime taking the road less traveled, seeing perspectives from others' shoes, and discovering that each of us has a different path and style and what works for one person may not be right for another. He created the free animal communication practice site with that in mind:  http://www.TalkToAnimals.weebly.com

 

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